Hong Kong’s beleaguered media, journalists caught in anti-Muslim violence, and Duterte’s parting “gifts”

A pro-democracy activist holds an electric candle in Victoria Park, the traditional site of the annual Tiananmen candlelight vigil, Hong Kong, China, 5 June 2022, as authorities kept a heavy presence to stop any public commemoration of the anniversary. Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

Arrests and censorship in the Philippines

Mass arrests of activists and censorship of independent news websites marked Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s final month in power.

“It is time for incoming President Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. to turn the page on media repression and immediately drop all pending charges against Ressa, her colleagues, and the Rappler media group, and take concrete measures to improve the broader media freedom climate in the country.”

Violence and shrinking civic space in India and Kashmir

Journalists and human rights defenders in India and Kashmir face worsening state intimidation amid rising anti-Muslim hate.

“The demolition of these individuals’ homes is arbitrary and undoubtedly against the law. Worst of all, it has become a symbol of hate targeted against Muslims amidst growing Islamophobia in the country,” said the Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA).

Media and protest restrictions in Hong Kong

As they have for the last two years, Hong Kong officials once again banned public activities commemorating the 4 June 1989 Tiananmen Massacre. Police threatened to arrest any individual joining an assembly or vigil to honour those who died in Tiananmen. No activity was held in public parks, but citizens promoted symbolic initiatives, and solidarity activities were organized outside Hong Kong.

On a positive note…

Hopes were revived in the Maldives after police arrested three men in connection with the 2014 disappearance of journalist Ahmed Rilwan and the 2017 fatal stabbing of blogger Yameen Rasheed. Will this progress finally lead to justice, after years of impunity?

In brief

Writers and artists groups are calling for the reversal of the death sentences handed out by Myanmar’s junta against anti-coup activists Ko Jimmy and Phyo Zayar Thaw. Ko Jimmy is part of the student movement that participated in the 1988 democracy uprising, while Phyo Zayar Thaw was a well-known hip-hop musician before joining the parliament in 2015. Both resisted the 2021 coup. The death sentence has not been used in Myanmar since 1988, and critics believe its revival reflects the escalation of the military’s “tactics of repression.”

--

--

IFEX is a global network of organisations that defend and promote the right to freedom of expression and information. Email: info@ifex.org

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
IFEX

IFEX

IFEX is a global network of organisations that defend and promote the right to freedom of expression and information. Email: info@ifex.org